Category: Uncategorized

Cannabis delivery in Vancouver is here and your right.

If you want fast Cannabis delivery call us.

We carry these products:

“DEATH BUBBA” is rated 4.7 out of 5 on LEAFLY. With sky-high THC levels, greater than 27% is likely to leave you in a waking coma, if you manage to stay awake. Rounding out the flavour with lemon zest and spiced rum makes this strain great as its ability to numb the body, this product is highly recommended for chronic pain, inflammation, and spasms. As previously mentioned, it is tremendously useful for those suffering from insomnia and is best used around bedtime for the greatest desired effect. Novice smokers should proceed with caution, as only intermediate to advanced cannabis experience is suggested.

“GREAN CRACK” is one of the best strains you can get your hands on. GC is always know to provide effects for even veteran consumers after only a few hits. GC is a crowd favourite due to its high potency and overall cerebral invigoration. If you love that energetic, happy, euphoric-uplifted feeling then this is the perfect sativa for you.Don’t let the name fool you: this is pure cannabis. Few strains compare to Green Crack’s sharp energy and focus as it induces an invigorating mental buzz that keeps you going throughout the day. With a tangy, fruity flavor redolent of mango, Green Crack is the perfect daytime medication for patients treating fatigue, stress, and depression.

“VIOLATOR” Violator Kush is one of the best idica strains ever. If you like indica strains then this one is for you. It is a pure indica from old school Dutch breeders Barney’s Farm. This indica provides a strong body buzz that will leave you stuck to your chair.These nugs are dusted with a fine layer of milky white trichomes and sticky sweet resin. Users describe the Violator Kush high as starting slowly with a lazy warming body buzz and a hint of euphoria. Throughout the high, the user will slowly fall into a state of utter sedation with complete couch-lock and a pretty intense case of the munchies. Violator Kush is said to be an ideal strain for treating patients suffering from conditions such as chronic pain due to injury or illness, appetite loss, and sleep disorders, including insomnia.

Cannabis delivery is our middle name.

Fast Marijuana Delivery Vancouver Is Here. If you need weed in 1 hour or less then you should call Potdash.ca.

Fast weed delivery is our middle name. Its a long middle name, granted, but it sure is our motto.

Marijuana home delivery within 1 hour is your right as a human being dammit.

So call the super hero’s of fast fast faster weed delivery in Vancouver.

Did I mention we are fast.

We carry:

“DEATH BUBBA” is rated 4.7 out of 5 on LEAFLY. With sky-high THC levels, greater than 27% is likely to leave you in a waking coma, if you manage to stay awake. Rounding out the flavour with lemon zest and spiced rum makes this strain great as its ability to numb the body, this product is highly recommended for chronic pain, inflammation, and spasms. As previously mentioned, it is tremendously useful for those suffering from insomnia and is best used around bedtime for the greatest desired effect. Novice smokers should proceed with caution, as only intermediate to advanced cannabis experience is suggested.

“GREAN CRACK” is one of the best strains you can get your hands on. GC is always know to provide effects for even veteran consumers after only a few hits. GC is a crowd favourite due to its high potency and overall cerebral invigoration. If you love that energetic, happy, euphoric-uplifted feeling then this is the perfect sativa for you.Don’t let the name fool you: this is pure cannabis. Few strains compare to Green Crack’s sharp energy and focus as it induces an invigorating mental buzz that keeps you going throughout the day. With a tangy, fruity flavor redolent of mango, Green Crack is the perfect daytime medication for patients treating fatigue, stress, and depression.

“GIRL SCOUT COOKIES” launches you to euphoria’s top floor where full-body relaxation meets a time-bending cerebral space. A little goes a long way with this hybrid, whose THC heights have won GSC numerous Cannabis Cup awards. Patients needing a strong dose of relief, however, may look to GSC for severe pain, nausea, and appetite loss. I Girl Scout Cookies comes on full-force: feelings of sudden giddiness are common, which can escalate into full-on euphoria. Users may feel increasingly chatty or disposed to socializing. There’s also a trippy, psychedelic component to the high. Smokers may notice an enhanced sense of hearing — or even of taste, with foods taking on a more dynamic flavour.

So for fast Marijuana home delivery in Vancouver call Potdash.ca.

Whats the Difference Between Top Shelf Marijuana vs Regular Marijuana?

Coming Soon.

Federal government’s plan for legalization of cannabis includes online sales with ‘secure home delivery’

The proposed legalization of marijuana next July includes the possibility of online sales – and the need to ensure it is delivered securely. (CBC)

The Liberal government’s point man on pot legalization says strict safeguards will be put in place for home delivery of the drug once it is available for purchase online as planned.

“If we’re going to use a mail delivery system, we have to make sure that that works, to make sure that this is not accessible to people underage,” Bill Blair, the parliamentary secretary to the minister of justice, told CBC News.

When the federal government introduced its cannabis legalization bill last April, it said provinces and territories would oversee sale and distribution of the drug. But it opened the door to online sales from federally licensed producers “with secure home delivery through the mail or by courier.”

Trudeau said last spring that an online system would guarantee access to marijuana if a province does not establish a retail framework to sell it legally.

“If [provinces] decide they don’t want to bring legislation forward, we will make [marijuana] available through a federal system, probably on the Internet,” Trudeau told VICE Canada during a town hall event on April 24, according to a report in the HuffPost.

Alberta announced its cannabis framework two weeks ago. That province won’t allow online sales at first because of concerns the drug could be delivered to someone under the legal age limit.

“There may not be online sales or home delivery of cannabis initially, but it’s not completely off the table,” Veronica Jubinville, spokesperson for Alberta’s justice minister, wrote in an email to CBC News.

“Online retail will be considered as part of our next steps once we understand more about the market and are confident we can ensure age verification.”

But in Ontario, online sales are expected to be allowed as soon as marijuana is legalized, and precautionary procedures will be built in, according to Scott Blodgett, spokesperson for the Ontario finance ministry — including “ID checks and signatures required upon delivery.”

Canada Post already delivers

Blair said marijuana that is ordered online won’t be delivered to just anyone. He said provinces and territories can establish their own secure system, but there has been one already in place for medical marijuana since 2013.

“It’s delivered by Canada Post, and there is an age verification — an identity verification — that takes place at the point of delivery at the door,” Blair said.

Edible marijuana products are displayed for sale at a Weeds Glass & Gifts medical marijuana dispensary in downtown Vancouver.

VANCOUVER — Diana Koch never wanted to numb her pain and anxiety with opioids. After seeing family members struggle with addiction, she felt pharmaceuticals were not an option.

Medical marijuana freed the 36-year-old from her troubling symptoms. But with recreational weed legalization looming, she worries about her portion of the market being swallowed up.

“People who are using it for medical purposes, they actually are suffering from something, from a condition that’s handicapping them in some way in their life,” she said, speaking from her home in Toronto.

“The recreational users are not,” she added. “There is a difference.”

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government plans to legalize recreational pot later this year, but medical users have been eligible to access cannabis since 2001. Patients can mail order from a licensed producer, grow their own or use a designated grower.

The government’s proposal to impose an $1-per-gram excise tax on medical marijuana, equivalent to that of recreational weed, has left many patients fuming. Koch said the plan will drive patients to opioids or the black market.

“It basically puts medical cannabis into the same category as alcohol and cigarettes,” she said.

Bill Blair, parliamentary secretary to the justice minister and lead on the legal pot program, has said the government doesn’t want taxation levels to be an incentive for people to use the medical system inappropriately.

The excise tax adds “insult to injury,” as cannabis patients are subject to federal sales tax, unlike prescription medicines, said Jonathan Zaid, founder of Canadians for Fair Access to Medical Marijuana.

Legalization is likely to open up more channels for medical pot research, as studies have been hobbled by the illegal status of marijuana, he said. But he’s still calling on the government to fund research, given the limited patentability of weed.

Patients are also pushing for greater insurance coverage. Marijuana can be claimed as a medical expense on an income tax return, and about five major unions and employers cover the medicine, including Veterans Affairs, but it’s still not broadly covered, Zaid said.

“The reality is that most patients still do struggle with affordability,” he said.

Many licensed producers are eager to produce medical cannabis and be seen as medical companies, in part due to export potential, said Ivan Ross Vrana, an industry consultant and vice-president of public affairs at Hill and Knowlton Strategies.

“We’ll be the first G7 nation that legalizes for recreational purposes, but all the other nations that are coming along, it’s medical first,” he said.

Canopy Growth Corp., Canada’s largest licensed producer, exports medical pot to Germany that is distributed in pharmacies. International production is the next step, and it’s building cultivation facilities in Jamaica and Denmark, said spokesman Jordan Sinclair.

“Any company that has a bunch of products sold all over the world, they’ve got a few main hubs, strategically, and then they just export from those hubs,” he said. “It would be similar for us.”

It’s still illegal in Canada to buy medical cannabis in a store, but that hasn’t stopped many patients from buying their pot from dispensaries that either operate in the black market or, in Vancouver and Victoria, have been licensed by the city.

Health Canada spokeswoman Tammy Jarbeau said it will be up to provinces to decide whether to licence medical cannabis dispensaries separately from recreational stores.

Most provinces have focused on the recreational market. B.C.’s regulations for non-medical stores include a stipulation that shops can’t choose a name that suggests they’re a medical operator, such as “apothecary” or “pharmacy.”

The federal government has indicated it won’t meet its original July 1 deadline for legalizing recreational bud, but once it does, the only legal products available for the first year will be dried cannabis and cannabis oil.

Many illegal dispensaries currently sell a wider range of products, including edibles, creams and suppositories.

Hilary Black, founder of the BC Compassion Club Society, the province’s first dispensary and a licence holder with the City of Vancouver, said she hopes recreational legalization has positive effects on medical cannabis users.

“My hope is that the legalization of cannabis is going to dissolve stigma, it’s going to fuel research and it’s going to continue to break down barriers for Canadian patients.”

This is a Reposted Article from Wikileaf… it’s a great article and very informative.

Perennially popular hybrid Girl Scout Cookies, also known as GSC, is a heavy hitter that gives users the best of both cerebral intensity and comfortable body melt. It originated on the West Coast as a cross between strong sativa Durban Poison and staple hybrid OG Kush. Although it’s a fairly even meld of its two potent parent strains, Girl Scout Cookies has a mellow high that leans more indica. Overall, it’s a versatile and balanced smoke with a THC content that ranges from 18% to 23% but has been tested as high as 28%.

Girl Scout Cookies tends to have larger buds that are chunky and densely-packed. The tightly-curled leaves are a bright spring green, and some phenotypes carry streaks of purple. In any cannabis strain, purple hues are evidence of anthocyanin pigments in the plant’s genetics that have been activated by cold temperatures during the vegetative stage. The colorful flowers are also marked by twisted orange pistils. With a very high resin content, buds are covered in white trichomes. They’re also very sticky and can be difficult to break up by hand. Girl Scout Cookies proves its bag appeal with a rich, complex scent — immediately obvious is a citrus sweetness, undercut by a baseline of earthy musk. When burnt or broken open, however, the buds give off a more toasty, biscuity scent, perhaps explaining the origin of the strain’s name. Smoke tends to be very smooth on the inhale and on the exhale tastes sweet and vaguely herbal.

Girl Scout Cookies comes on full-force: feelings of sudden giddiness are common, which can escalate into full-on euphoria. Users may feel increasingly chatty or disposed to socializing. There’s also a trippy, psychedelic component to the high. Smokers may notice an enhanced sense of hearing — or even of taste, with foods taking on a more dynamic flavor. A strong perception of time slowing down is also a commonly reported effect. Some relaxing physicality accompanies this head high; users may feel slightly heavier or more calm. And while Girl Scout Cookies won’t pin you down into an intractable state of couchlock, you may have more difficulty with tasks that require fine motor skills. This combination of easy-going effects on the mind and body means that Girl Scout Cookies has a wide range of medical applications. Its ability to elevate mood can make it while its sustained sense of focus and immediacy can help those who find themselves keyed-up by stress or anxiety. The strain’s thorough indica relaxation may also relieve patient’s aches and pains, whether incidental or chronic. Potent even for more experienced cannabis fans, Girl Scout Cookies’ balanced high often lasts longer than average.

Girl Scout Cookies can be grown from packaged seed or from “clone clippings” taken from mature plants. Once the means are obtained, this strain could be considered a convenient crop for growers of all experience levels. Grown outdoors, the plants require consistently warm and humid daytime surroundings — although the strain’s hardy genetics make it more resistant to adverse fluctuations in temperature. It can also be easily grown indoors, as the short and bushy plants take well to the “sea of green” technique. The thick and compact flowers may need external support from stakes in order to keep from drooping on their overburned branches. The plants flower typically within 9 to 10 weeks when grown indoors. Growers of Girl Scout Cookies can expect an average yield of about 2 ounces (or 56 grams) per plant. After the painstaking process of cultivation, growers should also be sure to properly cure their mature buds — curing involves first drying the buds by hanging them upside down for about a week in a room that maintains 50% humidity and a consistent temperature of 70 degree Fahrenheit; and then sealing the dried buds in wide-mouthed jars in an that maintains temperatures of 70 degrees Fahrenheit and between 60-65% humidity.

Do you want fast weed delivery in Vancouver? Marijuana to your door in 60 minutes or less? Door to door weed? Premium Marijuana delivered fast to your door in Vancouver? Weed to go? Herb to your curb?

Look no further Potdash.ca delivers top shelf premium pot to your door fast…within an hour.

60 Minute Marijuana Home Delivery Vancouver.

You must be 19 Years or older to order with 2 pieces of id.

If for any reason you are not 100% thrilled with our product or service; please let us know, and we will make it right.

UNBEATABLE QUALITY, PRICE, AND CONVENIENCE…WHY GO TO THE DISPENSARY?

KATIE M. PALMER SCIENCE 04.20.1607:00 AM

THE MARIJUANA ANALYTICS company Steep Hill doesn’t smell dank, or skunky, or “loud”—unless you happen to arrive when a client is dropping off a sample. No seven-pointed-leaf logos ornament the walls; no Tibetan prayer flags flutter from the doorframe. Inside, a half-dozen young scientists work in a glass-walled lab to the sounds of whirring ventilation and soft jazz. The effect is one of professionalism and scientific objectivity.

Still, this place is all about weed. And Reggie Gaudino, Steep Hill’s burly and dreadlocked 53-year-old vice president of scientific operations, does look the part. Steep Hill is headquartered in famously 420-friendly Berkeley, California, after all. “I’ve been smoking since I was 13 years old,” he says, looking down over a railing at the lab. It’s a world he has long appreciated. Now he’d like to give a little back. “There’s so much good that can be done with cannabis, and so little of it is being done.”

As more and more states (23 so far) are finding legal ways for people to consume cannabis, Steep Hill and labs like it are becoming more important. Steep Hill quantifies the numbers you see on labels in dispensaries: how much tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, the molecule that gets you high) and cannabidiol (CBD, the component of weed thought to alleviate seizures) are in a given strain of pot. But any remotely dedicated smoker will tell you that a strain is more than its potency. Purple Kush and Sour Diesel have different characters, different smells and tastes and feels. Those are the result of the interactions of hundreds of molecules—cannabinoids, yes, but also another class called terpenoids. Myrcene, for example, smells like hops and mango (and some fans claim it increases the potency of THC). Beta-caryophyllene has the scent of pepper. There’s also ocimene, nerolidol, pinene—the interaction of all these chemicals creates whatever distinction exists between ’78 LA OG Affie and, say, Green Crack.

So when someone drops off one of those samples at Steep Hill’s reception, the lab swoops in to quantify 27 of the most prominent of these flavorful, experience-defining molecules. After eight years in business, the company has accumulated and tested thousands of samples—it has stacks and stacks of plant tissue in test tubes in a giant freezer. It has analytical chemistry on those, and thanks to a deal with the marijuana review site Leafly, the company also has thousands of crowdsourced reviews. When it comes to data on weed, Steep Hill is, well, the bomb.

It’s one thing, though, to know what molecules are found in different weed strains. It’s another to know what those chemicals actually do—scientifically speaking. Their aromas certainly affect the experience of consumption, somehow. They might even underpin cannabis’s putative medicinal effects—fighting nausea, stimulating appetite, easing seizures, and perhaps even more.

And it’s yet another thing to understand the genetic basis for those differences. That’s the key. It’s what you need if you plan to breed scientifically, to enhance the qualities the market might pay for. Even more than legalization, that’s how you transform marijuana from an illicit pleasure to a licit business. “Every other commercially important agricultural plant in the world has had a ton of research done on it,” Gaudino says. “But here is this commercially important crop that has so much variation, and nobody knows what that variation’s all about.”

Plant biologists would love to understand cannabis better. But marijuana is a Schedule I drug in the United States, as illegal as heroin. Most academic researchers working with it are limited to (pathetic) weed grown at the University of Mississippi. Much of the research funding comes from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, which prioritizes studying ill effects over any potential good.

But Steep Hill has all those samples and all those chemical profiles. Now it just needs the genetics. And Gaudino, a geneticist and former patent agent, has a plan to get that. The problem is, deciphering the pot genome is, like, way harder than it sounds.

by Adrian Mack on March 23rd, 2018 at 11:50 AM

THE GEORGIA STRAIGHT

The laugh is instantly recognizable. It sounds like a Volkswagen skidding through slush on a gravel road.

 “How’s Van?” asks Cheech Marin, the voice equally familiar, if less exaggerated than we’re used to.

Van is becoming a playground for the rich, I answer, during a call to the comedian/actor/weed entrepreneur at his home in Los Angeles.

“Every place is becoming a playground for the rich,” he shoots back, that laugh threatening to devour all our bandwidth again. “I think the idea is to get rich yourself!”

Fair enough. Getting rich himself is nothing you could ever hold against the East L.A.–born Mexican-American itinerant who landed in Priddis, Alberta, back in 1968, when a poor-ass Cheech Marin first hit the cold north to avoid the draft.

His recollection of E.C. Manning’s Alberta in the ’60s: “I was expecting Sgt. Preston of the Yukon and Eskimos on their bobsleds, and it looked like Bakersfield. Cause it was oil and cattle country. It was northern Montana. It was country-and-western, but Ukrainian.”

He adds: “I wasn’t ready for the big city of Calgary.”

The better-known origin story has Marin eventually establishing himself in a somewhat bigger city than Calgary as “a broke hippie that was doing improv theatre in a topless bar on Main and Pender”. The Shanghai Junk was run by the one-time musician Tommy Chong, and the rest is memory-impaired history.

“Now it’s a bank,” he notes wryly. No kidding, we note back.

“Vancouver was the San Francisco of Canada,” continues Marin, fondly recalling, among other things, the early days of the Georgia Straight. “The counterculture revolution was happening there. But they didn’t have a war to protest against, so the galvanizing fact was that they were all young and had that sensibility in common.”

Marin came back to the city recently—he describes 21st-century Vancouver as “Pacific Rim cosmopolitan”—to make the exceptional, locally set weed-noir thriller Dark Harvestwith actor-writer-director James Hutson (lovingly reviewed by the Straight here). A would-be facetious inquiry into whether or not he thinks his new bud Hutson is a “flash in the pan” prompts another slushy round of laughter.

“It’s kinda like Cheech and Chong. Everything we did and every benchmark we achieved was thought of as a flash in the pan,” he says. “We were the number-one grossing comedy act for years in movies and records, and every time we did it, it was: ‘Ah, they just lucked out.’ But we just kept lucking out. For 30 years.” Here comes the laugh again. “It cracks me up.”

Delta, White Rock the latest to review bylaws as they wait for provincial regulation

By Maryse Zeidler, CBC News Posted: Feb 01, 2018 7:04 AM PT Last Updated: Feb 01, 2018 7:04 AM PT

Some Metro Vancouver cities are digging in their heels against the sale and production of cannabis ahead of looming federal legalization of the drug.

While Vancouver has chosen to license dispensaries, most municipalities in the Lower Mainland are banning them until the province decides how to regulate sales.

Marijuana will be legal in Canada as of July 1, but it will be up to the provinces to decide how the product is distributed.

On Tuesday, Delta held a public hearing on a sweeping bylaw changethat includes, among many other items, the prohibition of cannabis dispensaries. White Rock held a public hearing on Monday to ban dispensaries within city limits.

“Well, it’s illegal,” said White Rock Mayor Wayne Baldwin. “That’s a good reason.”

Baldwin said councillors in his city aren’t disputing the medicinal value of cannabis, they’re merely following federal laws.

He points out that cities in B.C. that do allow dispensaries tend to have their own police force — including Vancouver, Victoria and Nelson. Others, like White Rock, are policed by RCMP, which enforce federal laws.

The cities of Burnaby, Richmond and Surrey all said they don’t allow dispensaries to operate. They say they’re waiting for provincial regulations to come into play to see how they will be able to navigate within those rules.

‘It’s going to be interesting times’

Baldwin said White Rock may try to ban dispensaries even after marijuana is legalized. The city will hold more hearings and public consultations to gauge residents’ response.

“It’s going to be interesting times,” he said.

One group that opposed White Rock’s ban was Releaf, a compassion centre that provides education and distributes medical marijuana.

Aphria Broken Coast 20180115

The business used to operate in White Rock before it was destroyed in a fire in 2015.

“To create a bylaw about dispensaries that encompasses both medical and recreational marijuana is a disservice to the community,” said Tara Cain, Releaf’s executive director.

Cain said White Rock’s older demographic means residents aren’t always able to travel to places like Vancouver to access medical marijuana.

Grow-op ‘gold rush’

Another issue that some municipalities have to deal with is cannabis production, especially those with more rural areas.

In Delta, the city is looking to keep current rules that forbid growing cannabis except on farms governed by the Agricultural Land Reserve, over which the city doesn’t have much jurisdiction.

The ALR, which was established to protect food security, currently does allow federally licensed medical cannabis as an agricultural crop. But the province said a committee is currently reviewing the regulations and will provide recommendations “soon.”

Meanwhile, a new group named Citizens Protecting Agricultural Land has started a campaign called Stop Now that aims to “tackle what many believe is a looming ‘gold rush’ of marijuana grow-ops on B.C.’s prime farmland in the Agricultural Land Reserve.”